My momma always said, Life is Like a Box of Choc….or, for me, words (part 7)

writers, write, words, dictionaryMy box of chocolates is a new word or two or three.  My readers know how much I love the sound of words, the feel of them in my mouth, and the joy of finding out trivia about a certain word.  For example:

KerfuffleA commotion or fuss, especially one caused by conflicting views. (Oxford Dictionary)
Origin: Early 19th century: perhaps from Scots curfuffle (probably kerfuffle from Scottish Gaelic car ‘twist, bend’ + imitative Scots fuffle ‘to disorder’), or related to Irish cior thual ‘confusion, disorder’.

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investigateInvestigate: Carry out a systematic or formal inquiry to discover and examine the facts of (an incident, allegation, etc.) so as to establish the truth.

Origin: Early 16th century: from Latin investigat-traced out’, (or footprint) from the verb investigare, from in- ‘into’ + vestigare ‘track, trace out’.
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Limelight: The focus of public attention.to be in the limelight

Origin: A type of stage lighting once used in theatres and music halls. An intense illumination is created when an oxyhydrogen flame is directed at a cylinder of quicklime (calcium oxide),[2] which can be heated to 2,572 °C (4,662 °F) before melting. The light is produced by a combination of incandescence and candoluminescence. Although it has long since been replaced by electric lighting, the term has nonetheless survived, as someone in the public eye is still said to be “in the limelight.” The actual lights are called limes, a term which has been transferred to electrical equivalents.

Who invented it:  The limelight effect was discovered in the 1820s by Goldsworthy Gurney, based on his work with the “oxy-hydrogen blowpipe,” credit for which is normally given to Robert Hare. In 1825, a Scottish engineer, Thomas Drummond (1797–1840), saw a demonstration of the effect by Michael Faraday and realized that the light would be useful for surveying. Drummond built a working version in 1826, and the device is sometimes called the Drummond Light after him.

The earliest known use of limelight at a public performance was outdoors, over Herne Bay Pier, Kent, on the night of 3 October 1836.  Limelight was first used for indoor stage illumination in the Covent Garden Theatre in London in 1837 and enjoyed widespread use in theatres around the world in the 1860s and 1870s. Limelights were employed to highlight solo performers in the same manner as modern followspots (spotlights). Limelight was replaced by electric arc lighting in the late 19th century.
Aren’t these the most fascinating facts about these words?  I love them! 
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